Finding My Why: Sabah H

Updated: Oct 31, 2021

FoMO - A trending hashtag or a social problem?



Fear of Missing Out
Fear of Missing Out Joy of Missing Out

FoMO or “Fear of Missing Out” is more than a fun hashtag, it’s something we all fall victim to. You don’t think so? Ask yourself how many times you’ve bought something that was on sale? Or purchased a few extra toilet rolls at the start of the pandemic? These are just a few examples of how FoMO drives our behaviour.


Ask yourself how many times you’ve bought something that was on sale? Or purchased a few extra toilet rolls at the start of the pandemic?

What is FoMO exactly?

Fear of missing out, also known as FoMO, is a form of social anxiety in which people are worried that they might be missing out on something fun and exciting, while at the same time fearing that others think negatively about the absence of said thing. [1] In Australia, 50% of teenagers and 25% of adults have experienced FoMO across different areas of life.[2]


So how did FoMO get to me?

Young and impressionable, I was a tragic ‘foodie’ who wanted to be the ‘first’ to try something. I subscribed to food magazines, scoured the health food supermarket aisles for the newest protein bar, purchased different brands of overpriced muesli and followed the latest food trends. According to an article published on a financial education platform in Malaysia, Millennials are the most susceptible generation to follow trends fuelled by social media.[3]


It was only after I felt a sudden slump in energy, poor concentration, and a lighter wallet that I realised I was suffering from food-based FoMO which prevented me from making mindful decisions about the food I ate.


With a bit of maturity and self-reflection, I decided that my lifestyle had to change. Over a period of 5 years, I took a studious approach to eating. This meant interpreting food labels, reading peer-reviewed journals on how our food is sourced and spending time with allied health professionals to appreciate the holistic system of how nutrition, movement and mindset interrelate.


It was during this time, that some facts about food processing and its impact on our wider environment piqued my interest -


1) More eating occasions = More opportunities to eat processed food

According to the Australian Institute of Personal Trainers, the offerings in the grab and go foods segment have increased by 55%.[4]

As a result of more eating opportunities, 35% of Australians’ energy intake comes from junk food and highly processed snacks whilst less than 7% of Australians meet their daily vegetable intake requirements. [5]


2) Processed food consumption = increased waste

Currently Australian households throw away 3.1 million tonnes of edible food [6] and 1.9 million tonnes of packaging each year [7]. This figure is set to increase as food manufacturers continue to produce more processed and shelf stable foods requiring innovative packaging needed to maintain extended periods of shelf life.



But it’s not all bad news

Like me, many are beginning to understand the importance of adopting both nutritious and sustainable habits. Specifically, Australians are preferring fruit and vegetables over meat with 14% making a concerted effort to avoid red meat in their diet, demonstrating a growing social awareness of livestock agriculture’s impact on the environment.[8]


...Australians are preferring fruit and vegetables over meat with 14% making a concerted effort to avoid red meat in their diet

Turning my FoMO into JoMO (Joy of Missing Out)

In setting out to overcome my FoMO, I discovered another acronym – JoMO, the Joy of Missing Out. The liberation that comes from living in an independent way without feeling anxious has instilled an appreciation for the power of food in its natural form. This inspired me to help others through becoming a qualified personal trainer and weight management practitioner.

My hope as a blogger at Green Karma is to provide readers with an informed perspective on the impact their food choices have on their bodies and their wider environment.


May you all find your JoMO, (if you haven’t already!)



Sabah




References

[1] Ouelette C, 13 November 2019, ‘FOMO Marketing: Everything you need to know about Fear of Missing Out’, Trust Plus, 5 September 2021, https://trustpulse.com/fomo-marketing/

[2] Australian Psychological Society, 2015, ‘Stress & wellbeing How Australians are Coping with Life’, page 4, https://www.headsup.org.au/docs/default-source/default-document-library/stress-and-wellbeing-in-australia-report.pdf,

Australian Psychological Society, 8 October 2015, ‘Teens suffer the highest rates of FOMO’, 28 August 2021, https://www.psychology.org.au/news/media_releases/8nov2015-fomo

[3] ULearn Money, 24 April 2020 ,‘Common Factors that Drive Millenials to Follow Trends’, 5 September 2021, https://ulearnmoney.com/common-factors-that-drive-millennials-to-follow-trends/

[4] Australian Institute of Personal Trainers, 2017, ‘How do Aussies Eat?’, Australian Institute of Personal Trainers Blog, 28 August 2021, https://www.aipt.edu.au/articles/2017/07/australian-eating-habits-stats-and-survey-results

[5] Australian Institute of Personal Trainers, 2017, ‘How do Aussies Eat?’, Australian Institute of Personal Trainers Blog, 28 August 2021, https://www.aipt.edu.au/articles/2017/07/australian-eating-habits-stats-and-survey-results

[6] Commonwealth of Australia 2017, ‘National Food Waste Strategy, Having Australia’s Food Waste by 2030’, pp. 6

[7] Sustainability Victoria, 2021, ‘Reduce Packaging’, 28 August 2021, https://www.sustainability.vic.gov.au/recycling-and-reducing-waste/at-home/avoid-waste/shop-sustainably/reduce-packaging#:~:text=Sustainable%20shopping%20includes%20consideration%20of,Cricket%20Ground%20nine%20times%20over.

[8] Australian Institute of Personal Trainers, 2017, ‘How do Aussies Eat?’, Australian Institute of Personal Trainers Blog, 28 August 2021, https://www.aipt.edu.au/articles/2017/07/australian-eating-habits-stats-and-survey-results

61 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All